Texas fish and game books

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These records cover the Texas Game and Fish Commission's administrative activities, finances Your Book on Texas Conservation of Wildlife, ,‚Äč Salmon-Trout-Steelheader, Sandlapper, Scouting, Southern Traveler, Sport Fishing Magazine, Springfield! Magazine, Texas Parks & Wildlife Book Publishers. Magazine, Texas Parks & Wildlife Book Publishers: Conservatory of American Letters, Cornell Maritime Press, Down East Books, Falcon Publishing, FrankAmato.

Administrative files, bulk. Monthly reports to the Comptroller,bulk. Project files, bulk. Rollover Pass project photographs,bulk.

Where to Wade Fish - Texas Parks and Wildlife [Official]

The Texas Game and Fish Commission managed wildlife, fish, and marine resources and sanctuaries; conducted research and gathered information on Texas' fish and game; promoted preservation efforts; regulated hunting activities and enforced game laws; educated the public about conservation and environmental issues; controlled the sand, shell, and gravel in Texas' waters; and oversaw the operations of fish hatcheries, game preserves, and oyster beds throughout Texas until its merger with the Texas State Parks Board to form the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department in House Bill 21, 58th Legislature, Regular Session.

The Texas Game and Fish Commission traces its history back to early government conservation efforts during the late s. Charged with monitoring compliance to fish preservation legislation, the Texas Office of the Fish Commissioner was established in Chapter 78, 17th Legislature, Regular Session and lasted until Early duties included protecting marine life and oyster beds along Texas bays and coastal waters.

Due to growing concerns over regulating hunting and preserving wild game, a game department was added in House Bill30th Legislature, Regular Session and the office was renamed the Texas Office of Game, Fish, and Oyster Commissioner. This department was designated to issue hunting licenses with the idea that the department would sell enough licenses to absorb its operating costs.

Duringthe year the first hunting license law was passed in Texas, the department sold five thousand licenses. Throughout the s and s the Office of the Fish and Oyster Commissioner continued its conservation efforts with projects focusing on gathering specimens of native birds, promoting awareness of growing pollution problems, and exploring water sewage issues.

The department grew considerably in House Bill 85, 38th Legislature, 3rd Called Session when the game fund was turned over to the agency instead of remaining under the Legislature's control and forty-five game wardens were hired. This development made the enforcement of game laws possible, and two years later the activities of the Commissioner expanded further when fish hatchery construction resumed and game sanctuaries were created.

Along with these activities came a new emphasis on public education and awareness of environmental issues, and the Division of Education, Publicity, and Research was formed in to oversee publications and establish a relationship with the press.

Composed of six members appointed by the governor with six-year overlapping terms, the Commission held regular quarterly meetings as well as special session meetings around the state every year.

William J. Tucker was appointed the first Executive Secretary of the Commission and A. Wood its first Chairman. The Commission handled written and personal requests on designating areas as land preserves and changes in game laws and regulations.

The Commission also made decisions about fish hatchery, oyster, and predatory animal control activities, and instituted departmental policies and reviewed departmental projects. With the s came increased rebuilding of fish hatcheries and growth in the killings of predatory animals, though the Great Depression and ensuing dwindling financial resources forced the Commission to conduct departmental salary reductions and layoffs.

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Despite the influx of federal relief funds during the early s, in the number of game wardens was reduced from one hundred twenty-five to sixty-five. Public outreach continued to grow as well during the s, and the Commission conducted radio programs and produced a number of educational films. The Commission also replaced its monthly bulletin with Texas Game and Fish magazine, published monthly and reaching over six thousand subscribers.

In Senate Bill52nd Legislature, Regular Sessionthe Commission was renamed as the Texas Game and Fish Commission and the number of commissioners was increased from six to nine.

TEXAS GAME AND FISH COMMISSION

During the s the Commission was organized into seven divisions. By the Game and Fish Commission had been reorganized into three major divisions with five regional headquarters and twenty district headquarters, and consisted of over six hundred employees. The Texas Game and Fish Commission managed wildlife, fish, and marine resources and sanctuaries; conducted research and gathered information on Texas fish and game; promoted preservation efforts; regulated hunting and fishing activities; enforced game laws; educated the public about conservation and environmental issues; controlled the sand, shell, and gravel in Texas' waters; and oversaw the operations of fish hatcheries, game preserves, and oyster beds throughout Texas until its merger with the Texas State Parks Board to form the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department in The records date,bulk Types of records consist of minutes, correspondence, project reports, loose 4 x 6 pages from disassembled field notebooks, clippings, publications and other printed materials, questionnaires, news releases, memoranda, proclamations, petitions, legal style documentation, legislative information, ledgers, field and research notes, maps, and photographs.

Divided into five series Minutes, Administrative files, Monthly reports to the Comptroller, Project files, and the Rollover Pass project photographsthe records document administrative activities, finances and operations, educational material, wildlife research and findings, and federal aid to wildlife project reports.

The minutes cover the Game and Fish Commission's administrative, financial, and operational matters, while the administrative files illustrate its wide range of administrative, legal, financial, and operational activities. The monthly reports to the Comptroller contain information on the Commission's financial activities, while the project files are comprised of the quarterly, annual, and special reports and supporting data relating to the federal aid to wildlife project undertaken by the Commission in the late s to mids.

The Rollover Pass project photographs series contains negatives, photographs, and several office memoranda, which cover the construction and dedication of Rollover Pass on the Bolivar Peninsula, damage from storms, and the landscape of Rollover Pass. To prepare this inventory, the described materials were cursorily reviewed to delineate series, to confirm the accuracy of contents lists, to provide an estimate of dates covered, and to determine record types.

Most records created by Texas state agencies are not copyrighted and may be freely used in any way. State records also include materials received by, not created by, state agencies. Copyright remains with the creator.

TEXAS PARKS AND WILDLIFE DEPARTMENT

The researcher is responsible for complying with U. Copyright Law Title 17 U. Researchers are required to use gloves provided by the Archives when reviewing photographic materials.

The following materials are offered as possible sources of further information on the agencies and subjects covered by the records. The listing is not exhaustive. Identify the item and cite the seriesTexas Game and Fish Commission records. Two accessions were transferred by an unknown agency many years ago and were assigned accession numbers for control purposes on April 10 and 11, Repository Browse List.

Contact Us. Accessing Materials Described Here. The Texas Game and Fish Commission managed wildlife, fish, and marine resources and sanctuaries; conducted research and gathered information on Texas fish and game; promoted preservation efforts; regulated hunting and fishing activities; enforced game laws; educated the public about conservation and environmental issues; controlled the sand, shell, and gravel in Texas waters; and oversaw the operations of fish hatcheries, game preserves, and oyster beds throughout Texas until its merger with the Texas State Parks Board to form the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department in Types of records consist of minutes, correspondence, various reports, clippings and other printed materials, news releases, memoranda, proclamations, petitions, legislative information, maps, and photographs.

These records cover the Texas Game and Fish Commission's administrative activities, finances and operations, educational material, wildlife research and findings, and federal aid to wildlife project reports. The terms listed here were used to catalog the records.

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The terms can be used to find similar or related records. Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. Parks and Wildlife Department administrative records and other material,bulk Parks and Wildlife Commission meeting files,22 cubic ft. Park and Wildlife Department's Inland Fisheries Division's records,bulk4 cubic ft. Park and Wildlife Department's Library's holdings of federal aid project reports,21 cubic ft.

Texas Legislature. House of Representatives. Committee on Game and Fisheries, Records Restricted, fractional. There is no finding aid for this unprocessed collection.

Texas Game and Fish Commission:

Ben G. Oneal Papers,53 linear inches. The Texas Game and Commission managed wildlife, fish, and marine resources and sanctuaries; conducted research and gathered information on Texas fish and game; promoted preservation efforts; regulated hunting activities and enforced game laws; educated the public about conservation and environmental issues; controlled the sand, shell, and gravel in Texas waters; and oversaw the operations of fish hatcheries, game preserves, and oyster beds throughout Texas until its merger with the Texas State Parks Board to form the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department in Records present are minutes of the Game and Fish Commission and its predessor, the Game, Fish, and Oyster Commission, bound into fourteen volumes and two indexes to volumes three and six.

The minutes are dated ; the two indexes to the minutes are undated. The minutes are also available on microfilm and contain some purchase vouchers that were filmed with the minutes,2 rolls.

These records provide insights into the functions of the Commission and cover a variety of topics during regular quarterly and special session meetings.

Outdoor Annual

Topics include appropriations, establishing game and fishing seasons and regulations, in-person and written requests for dredging and putting land under status as a game preserve, predatory animal control programs, construction of fish and shellfish hatcheries, training for game wardens, and wildlife research endeavors. These records are arranged in original order as maintained by the agency, which is chronological. Administrative files, bulk14 cubic ft.

and texas game books fish

The Texas Game and Fish Commission managed wildlife, fish, and marine resources and sanctuaries; conducted research and gathered information on Texas fish and game; promoted preservation efforts; regulated hunting activities and enforced game laws; educated the public about conservation and environmental issues; controlled the sand, shell, and gravel in Texas waters; and oversaw the operations of fish hatcheries, game preserves, and oyster beds throughout Texas until its merger with the Texas State Parks Board to form the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department in Types of records consist of correspondence, various reports, 4 x 6 notes from disassembled field notebooks, clippings and other printed materials, questionnaires, news releases, memoranda, proclamations, petitions, legislative information, ledgers, maps, and photographs.

Records are dated, bulk Topics include administrative and financial matters relating to Commission projects, personnel, and operating costs; correspondence between the executive secretary and assorted politicians and businessmen; correspondence relating to high school conservation surveys; environmental and conservation legislation; documents relating to court cases; rules and regulations of the Commission; educational materials and questionnaires; game warden training and the game warden school.

Additional subjects covered include plant and vegetation, soil conservation, shooting preserve, and fur resources data; and fish hatchery reports. Maps generally correspond to written reports by game managers and wildlife biologists, and detail information on vegetation statistics, farming and ranching land, and wildlife habitats.

Many folders contain 4 x 6 loose pages from disassembled field notebooks, which record wildlife sightings and other data, and are scattered throughout the series.

Black and white photographs also support these reports and document various aspects of Texas wildlife and vegetation. Records are divided into three groups: Topical files; Ledgers, ; and Publications and reference materials Topical files contain the bulk volume of the records, and principally cover activities and operations of the Commission; the Ledgers document fish and oyster dealers, information about oyster beds, mussel, shell, and pearl sales, game wardens, and agreements for protecting wild game; and the Publication and reference materials include Texas Game and Fish publications, such as educational and monthly bulletins, and publications from national and other state wildlife and conservation agencies.

These records are primarily arranged in original order as maintained by the agency. Loose materials were organized and foldered by State Archives staff. Records are divided into three groups: Topical files, ; Ledgers,; and Publications and reference materials, One accession was transferred by an unknown agency many years ago and was assigned an accession number for control purposes on April 11, A petition to the Texas Game Commission urging the publication Closing of West, Chocolate, and Oyster Bays, [2 folders].

Quail file - Orders Already Made Up, [2 folders].

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Dallas fish hatchery, fall distribution, spring This folder contains correspondence with no contact information. For more information see transfer sheets located in folder. The notes were used by game managers and field biologists to record wildlife sightings and other data, and are scattered throughout the Administrative files and Project files series.

Throckmorton High School biology class and questionnaire, Miscellaneous data - FFA game survey - Iredell, about County data on population, soil, preserves, etc.

Economic survey - old region No. Fish and shrimp correspondence, reports, and data, about

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5 thoughts on “Texas fish and game books

  1. Gulkis

    These tips come from fishing guides who fish the waters professionally. Shop Now. Fish & Game GEAR. TF&G Books.

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  2. Karg

    New in Fishing. New Alligator gar regulations; Length and bag limit updates for bass at certain waterbodies; Streamlined bag limits for spotted seatrout; Red.

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  3. Tukasa

    The Texas Parks and Wildlife Outdoor Annual includes regulations for then the cold storage or processing facility record book is required by law.

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  4. Zusar

    For fishing, hunting, boating & camping participants throughout Texas. Product details. Subscription Length: 1 year. Format.

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  5. Sham

    TEXAS GAME AND FISH COMMISSION. The idea of managing the state's wildlife resources developed over several decades in the latter half.

    Reply

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